Home Values Climb 0.8 Percent

FHFA Home Price Index (From Peak To Present)

Maybe homes are holding value better than we thought.

CASE-SHILLER INDEX UP 0.8 PERCENT

One month after reporting that its home price gauge had officially double dipped, Standard & Poor’s says prices have inched up, in line with the expected seasonal boost that accompanies the spring buying season. Tuesday, the S&P’s Case-Shiller Index showed home values higher by 0.8 percent in April, on a monthly basis.   Led by Washington, D.C. and San Francisco, 13 of the Case-Shiller’s 20 tracked markets showed improvement in April. 

It’s the first monthly gain in eight months. The composite reading remains 4.0 percent below April 2010.

For the broader 10-City composite (CSXR), home values increased a nominal 0.6% from March to April, down 32.6% from a June 2006 peak as values fell 3.1% year-over-year.

Between March and April of this year, home values rose 0.8 percent nationally, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s Home Price Index.   It’s the index’s first month-to-month improvement since May of last year.

Values are down 19 percent since peaking 4 years ago.  Private-sector data affirms the government’s report. 

BAY AREA CASE-SHILLER UP 1.7 PERCENT

Kentfield Home, Marin County

Here in the Bay Area, according to the April 2011 S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index, single-family home prices in the San Francisco MSA increased 1.7% from March ’11 to April ’11, down 39.5% from a peak in May 2006 and down 5.5% year-over-year (YOY), still a steady slide from the 18.3% gain reported last May and the fifth consecutive month of year-over-year declines, as reported in a SocketSite.com article.

WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU

As a home seller , it’s nice to see reports of rising home prices after multiple months of “bad news”.   However, the data may not be as rosy as it appears to be. National real estate surveys including the Home Price Index and the Case-Shiller Index are flawed for everyday buyers and sellers.

The biggest flaw is “age”. Both the Home Price Index and the Case-Shiller Index report on a near 2-month delay.

This week, the calendar turns to July. Yet, we’re still discussing housing news from April. The housing market of 60 days ago was very different from the housing market of today. Mortgage rates are different, market drivers are different, and the pool of buyers is likely different, too.

We can’t discuss today’s housing market with “April” in mind. The data is irrelevant.

Another flaw is that both reports are national in scope. Real estate, by contrast, is local.

When we cite the Home Price Index or the Case-Shiller Index, for example, and say “home values rose 0.8% in April”, we’re just giving a national average.   On the local level, some markets rose by more, some rose by less, and others actually fell.

People buy homes on a specific block of a specific street in a specific neighborhood.   Data for homes like that can’t be captured in a national survey.

The group that gets the most value from the Home Price Index and Case-Shiller is Wall Street and policy-makers.   The indices do a fair job of reporting how housing behaves as a whole, but for individuals concerned with buying and selling homes, the best place to find real-time, accurate data is from a real estate professional.

I know Marin County real estate, track its performance and inventory.  Feel free to contact me whether you are thinking of buying or selling your very own piece of Marin.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


Top 25 Least Expensive and 5 Most Expensive U.S. Cities

25 Least Expensive U.S. Cities

A report issued Monday by the U.S. government showed core inflation rising 2.5 percent in the last 12 months for its biggest one-year gain since January 2010.

Inflation can be defined as the overall general upward price movement of goods and services in an economy.  Consequently, as inflation goes up, everyday living is becoming more expensive, it seems. 

But not every city in the US. has the same cost of living.  Rising gas, food, and health-care costs have some Americans wondering where their dollars can do more. 

There are some U.S. towns in which the cost of living remains affordable — and downright cheap — as compared to the national average. They’re detailed in a BusinessWeek piece titled “The Cheapest 25 Cities In The U.S“.

In comparing costs across 340 urban areas as compiled by the Council of Community & Economic Research, cities in Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee and Oklahoma ranked consistently high. Cities in Hawaii did not.

Take note, though. Although the BusinessWeek piece highlights inexpensive cities in which to live, a low cost of living does not necessarily correlate to a high standard of living. Cost-leader Harlingen, Texas, for example, boasts a poverty rate nearly triple the national average.

Other “Inexpensive Cities” feature similar poverty rates.

The Top 10 “cheapest cities”, as shown by BusinessWeek are:

  1. Harlingen, Texas
  2. Pueblo, Colorado
  3. Pryor Creek, Oklahoma
  4. McAllen, Texas
  5. Cookeville, Tennessee
  6. Commerce-Hunt County, Texas
  7. Brownsville, Texas
  8. Fort Smith, Arkansas
  9. Muskogee, Oklahoma
  10. Springfield, Illinois

At the other end of the spectrum, the top 5 most expensive cities/areas were, in order, Manhattan, New York; Brooklyn, New York; Honolulu, Hawaii; San Francisco, CA; and Queens, New York.

Manhattan’s cost of living is more than twice the national average.

The complete list is available at the BusinessWeek website.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


A Simple Explanation Of The Federal Reserve Statement (June 22, 2011 Edition)

Putting the FOMC statement in plain EnglishToday the Federal Open Market Committee voted to leave the Fed Funds Rate unchanged within its current target range of 0.000-0.250 percent.

The vote was 10-0 — the fourth straight unanimous vote for the nation’s Central Bank.

In its press release, the FOMC said that the economy is recovering, although “somewhat more slowly” than what was expected. Labor markets have been weaker than anticipated and the Fed believes that is, in part, a result of higher food and energy costs, and supply chain disruptions as a result of “tragic events in Japan”.

Some economic bright spots identified by the Fed include expanding household spending, and increased business investment.

These comments were in-line with what Wall Street expected from Chairman Ben Bernanke and the members of the Federal Open Market Committee.

The Fed stayed on message with respect to inflation, too. It acknowledged inflationary pressures on the economy, but attributed them to rising commodity costs and the aforementioned supply-chain disruption. The Fed expects long-term inflation to be stable. 

And, lastly, the Federal Reserve re-affirmed its plan to end its $600 billion pledge to bond markets June 30, and to hold the Fed Funds Rate near zero percent “for an extended period” of time. 

Again, no surprise.

Mortgage market reaction to the FOMC statement has been even this afternoon. Mortgage rates are unchanged and leaning lower. Note that sentiment can shift quickly, however. If today’s mortgage rates fit your budget, consider locking in your rate.

The FOMC’s next scheduled meeting is August 9, 2011.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


How To Clean Outdoor Furniture : Resin, Wood And Metal

This week marks the official start of Summer. With temperatures in the 90’s, you will want to enjoy your home’s outdoor area and make sure that your furniture is clean.

In this 4-minute video from Lowe’s, you’ll learn tricks to keep your outdoor furniture clean, and protected from the elements. All types of outdoor furniture are covered in the lesson including metal, resin-based, and wooden.

The offered tips include:

  • Why you should never remove the “care tags” from a furniture pillow
  • Choosing the proper pressure-washer tip for the job at-hand
  • How to use car wax as a rust-preventative

Furthermore, the instructional video includes tips for cleaning fabrics and canopies; and for shampooing an outdoor rug.

There’s lot of reasons to keep your outdoor furniture clean — health reasons among them — but it shouldn’t be lost that clean furniture will have a longer useful life than furniture that’s been neglected or ignored.

Clean your outdoor pieces at least twice annually and they’ll give you years of good looks and comfort.


Foreclosures in Marin County: the Real Story

Foreclosure rates have been falling for the past 16 months, but let’s take a look at what is really happening both nationally and here in our beautiful Marin County.

Rick Sharga of RealtyTrac explains the reasons why this drop in foreclosure activity does not mean there are fewer distressed homeowners.

NATIONAL FORECLOSURE ACTIVITY IN MAY

May 2011 foreclosure activity - Source Realty Trac

According to foreclosure-tracking firm RealtyTrac, monthly foreclosure filings fell 2 percent in May to just under 215,000 filings nationwide.   A foreclosure filing is defined as any one of the following: a default notice, a scheduled auction, or a bank repossession. 

As you heard on the video, all three stages of foreclosure activity have dropped:

  • Initial Notices of Default dropped by 7% from the previous month and 39% from the previous year to 59,000.
  • Scheduled auctions dropped by 3% from the previous month and 33% from the previous year.
  • Repossessions dropped by 4% from the previous month and 29% from the previous year.

On an annual basis, foreclosure counts have dropped over 16 consecutive months, dating back to January 2010.

What is happening in the foreclosure market is a reflection of what is transpiring in the broader housing market which continues to be obstinately weak nationally: May sales were down 6.8% from a year ago and the median sale price was down 14% year over year.  This is driven by continued weakness in the economy and the stubbornly high unemployment rate which is staying more or less flat at a little over 9%. 

Foreclosure activity continues to be delayed for a number of reasons.

  • First, the foreclosure market is already saturated and until we see more traction and more sales,  lenders are not incited to move quickly on foreclosures.  They already have a huge load of foreclosed homes on their books–assets they cannot sell in a timely and cost effective manner.
  • Second, banks are still working out processing activities resulting from the Robosigning scandal last year.  Tens of thousands of foreclosures are being refiled and are blocking the court systems. 

Rick Sharga’s forecast is that the number of foreclosed homes is going to start trickling up by the end of 2011 and that it is unlikely that we will see an end to foreclosure activity by the end of 2011 or anytime soon. 

FORECLOSURES ARE LOCAL

Like all things in real estate, though, foreclosures are local.  Six states accounted for more than half of the country’s foreclosure filings in May.   Those six states — California, Michigan, Arizona, Florida, Georgia and Texas — represent just 34% of the U.S. population.

On a per household basis, the figures remain disproportionate as well:

  • Top 10 Foreclosure States : 1 foreclosure per 357 households, on average
  • Bottom 10 Foreclosure States : 1 foreclosure per 8,764 households, on average

FORECLOSURES IN MARIN COUNTY

The foreclosure rate in Marin County for May was 1 in 517, compared to the nationwide foreclosure rate of 1 per 605 households.  While our rate is much lower than the California rate, we are slightly above the national average rate:

May 2011 - Source RealtyTrac

On a city by city basis, Novato still has the lion share of foreclosures with 69 and San Rafael remains a close second with 56.

Foreclosure activity in Marin County in May 2011 - Source RealtyTrac

In May Marin County’s housing market activity has been  slow compared to last year, but the median sale price remains at the same level.

  • Home for sale: 1028, down 11.28 year over year
  • Sales: 208, down 13.3% year over year
  • Median Sale Price: $705,000, down 0.8% year over year.

WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU

As a home buyer, foreclosures matter.   Nationwide distressed homes account for close to 40% of home resales and that’s because distressed properties often sell at steep discounts; in some markets, up to 20 percent less than a comparable, non-distressed home.   Foreclosed homes can be a great “deal”, therefore, but only if you’ve done your homework. 

Buying a bank-repossessed home is different from buying a home from a regular seller. The contracts and negotiation process are different, and homes are sometimes sold with defects.

If you plan to purchase a foreclosure, therefore, speak with a real estate professional first.   With foreclosures, there’s a lot you can learn online, but when it comes time to submit an actual bid, you’ll want an agent who has experience with distressed properties on your side.

As a home seller, if you are experiencing difficulties paying your mortgage, you should contact an agent who is a distressed property expert and can help you identify your options, refer you to trustworthy professionals, if need be,  and,  if applicable, assist you in avoiding foreclosure through a short sale.

As a Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE), I can assist you with either the purchase of a short sale or a foreclosure or the sale of your distressed home.  Feel free to contact me with any question: Cell/text: 415.505.4789 or email: Sylvie@YourPieceofMarin.com.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


Short sales demystified

In this FOX Strategy Room interview Alex Charfen, CEO of the Certified Distressed Property Institute (CDPE), explains in layman’s terms the difference between short sales and foreclosures, who qualifies for a short sale and a loan modification, what is a strategic default and much more.

As a CDPE agent, I can help you or anyone you know who is experiencing financial difficulties and is worried about losing their home to foreclosure.

Together we can identify all possible options and when possible, I can assist in the quick execution of a short sale transaction.  Don’t hesitate to contact me (415.505.4789 or Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com), all information is kept strictly confidential.

_____________________________________________________________________________

About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County!

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


MORTGAGE MARKET WEEK IN REVIEW – June 10, 2011

WEEK IN REVIEW

“Flight to Quality” continues to be the dominant market theme as investors flee the equity market for the safe haven of Treasury bonds. This in turn is forcing bond yields lower and interest rates along with them — Great news for anybody in the market to buy a home or refinance.

CURRENT INTEREST RATES | JUNE 10, 2011

CONFORMING RATES
($200,000 – $417,000) 0 POINT
• 30 Year Fixed: 4.500% (4.58% APR)
• 5/1 ARM: 3.125% (3.20% APR)
JUMBO RATES
($729,751 – $2,000,000) 1 POINT
• 30 Year Fixed: 4.875% (5.02% APR)
• 5/1 ARM: 3.500% (3.64% APR)
CONFORMING (HIGH-BALANCE) RATES
($417,001 – $729,750 cap by county) 0 POINT
• 30 Year Fixed: 4.750% (4.81% APR)
• 5/1 ARM: 3.500% (3.56% APR)
RATE TRENDS
Rates are SAME compared to last week.
Rates are DOWN compared to last month.
Rates are DOWN compared to one year ago.
 

INDUSTRY NEWS

The FHA 203K Loan

Home loan financing and the funds for renovation all in one loan!
 
Have you found a home that would be perfect if it had a few updates? Or perhaps you are considering improving your current home, or renovating your bathroom or kitchen. If any of these possibilities are in your future, an FHA 203K loan may be a good option for your renovation needs.

The FHA 203K loan provides financing and funds for the cost of renovation in one easy loan closing process to qualified borrowers. If you qualify, you will receive a cost-effective single-close option that enables you to remodel a kitchen or bath, repair a roof or make other important improvements to an existing or newly purchased home that needs renovation. (1)

FHA 203K features:
    • Primary residences
    • 1- to 4-unit properties
    • Purchase and rate/term refinancing
    • Fixed rate mortgages with 30-year term
    • One underwriting review and one closing for rehabilitation construction and permanent financing

Advantages to the FHA 203K
    • Down payment as low as 3.5%
    • One loan amount for the purchase or refinance and the repairs
    • Up to six months allowed for completion of rehabilitation construction
    • Loan fees may be financed
    • Great tool for REO Properties
    • Cost effective way to renovate an existing home
    • Mortgage is FHA insured
    • Mortgage amount may also be increased when combining EEM (Energy Efficient Mortgage) with the FHA 203K
Maximum loan amounts and other restrictions apply. Ask for details. (1) Borrowers may use the loan to make any improvements that add value to the property and are permanently affixed. Most improvements and repairs are acceptable for financing; however, the following are ineligible in all cases: new detached living units, improvements intended for commercial/business use and non-permanent improvements.

Have a wonderful weekend!

This report reproduced with the permission of
Gina Kemsley

gkemsley@terramb.com
Office: (415) 464-3144
Cell: (415) 828-0218
Fax: (888) 449-0329
DRE License #: 01121768
NMLS #: 291780

Copyright © 2011 Gina Kemsley, Terra Mortgage Banking, All rights reserved.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.

 


Do You Know What Questions To Ask Your Lender?

A mortgage comes with many moving pieces and understanding them is the key to getting a great deal.   Unfortunately, studies show that few Americans have a firm grasp of how mortgages work — from mortgage types to mortgage fees.

In this back-to-basics interview on NBC’s The Today Show, you’ll learn some mortgage planning basics to help you get smarter with your next home loan — purchase or refinance.

Some of the topics covered include:

  • The mortgage applicants for whom adjustable-rate mortgages are a better choice than fixed-rate mortgages
  • Why you should include “How Good Is This Lender?”-type questions in the rate shopping process
  • What a pre-qualificaton letter is good for, and what it is not good for

There is also one of the most simple explanations of “discount points” ever offered on network television.

The video runs 4-and-a-half minutes. For first-time buyers and experienced ones, it’s worth a watch. You’ll pick up some tips to use when shopping for your next mortgage.

If you need a referral to trustworthy mortgage professional with an excellent track record, feel free to contact me at 415.505.4789 or Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com.

Mt. Tam - Greenbrae, CA

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.


Time to get a Carbon Monoxide Detector – new California law

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that’s produced whenever fuels such as gas, oil, kerosene, wood or charcoal are burned. Low levels of carbon monoxide exposure can make victims feel like they are suffering from the flu, while higher levels can be lethal.  Carbon monoxide is responsible for about 480 deaths annually nationwide and 20,000 emergency room trips.

Many heaters, fireplaces, furnaces, and appliances that use coal, wood or petroleum emit CO.  Currently, only one in ten Californians have the alarms, according to a survey by First Alert.

There is a new law regarding carbon monoxide poisoning:  The Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act of 2010  requires carbon monoxide detectors to be installed in each “dwelling unit intended for human occupancy” having a fossil fuel burning heater or appliance, fireplace, or an attached garage by July 1, 2011 for single family residences and by January 1, 2013 for all other dwellings.

A carbon monoxide detector  is a relatively inexpensive device ($20 – $60) similar to a smoke detector that signals detection of carbon monoxide in the air.  Under the law, a carbon monoxide device is “designed to detect carbon monoxide and produce a distinct audible alarm.”  It can be battery powered , or a plug-in device with battery backup.

If the carbon monoxide device is combined with a smoke detector, it must emit an alarm or voice warning in a manner that clearly differentiates between a carbon monoxide alarm warning and a smoke detector warning.

This new law requires the owner “to install the devices in a manner consistent with building standards applicable to new construction for the relevant type of occupancy or with the manufacturer’s instructions, if it is technically feasible to do so” (Cal. Health & Safety Code § 17926(b)).

Building standards applicable to new construction specify that carbon monoxide detectors should be installed outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedroom(s) in dwelling units and on every level including basements within which fuel-fired appliances are installed and in dwelling units that have attached garages.

The following language comes packaged with carbon monoxide (CO) detectors:

“For minimum security, a CO Alarm should be centrally located outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.  The Alarm should be located at least 6 inches (152mm) from all exterior walls and at least 3 feet (0.9 meters) from supply or return vents. “

A violation of this law is an infraction punishable by a maximum fine of $200 for each offense. However, a property owner must receive a 30-day notice to correct first.  If an owner who receives such a notice fails to correct the problem within the 30-day period, then the owner may be assessed the fine.

All landlords of dwelling units must install carbon monoxide detectors as indicated above.  The law gives a landlord authority to enter the dwelling unit for the purpose of installing, repairing, testing, and maintaining carbon monoxide devices “pursuant to the authority and requirements of Section 1954 of the Civil Code [entry by landlord].”

The carbon monoxide device must be operable at the time that a tenant takes possession.  However, the tenant has the responsibility of notifying the owner or owner’s agent if the tenant becomes aware of an inoperable or deficient carbon monoxide device.  The landlord is not in violation of the law for a deficient or inoperable carbon monoxide device if he or she has not received notice of the problem from the tenant.

This blog post is intended to provide general answers to general questions and is not intended as a substitute for individual legal advice. Advice in specific situations may differ depending upon a wide variety of factors. Therefore, readers with specific legal questions should seek the advice of an attorney.

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About the author: The above Real Estate information on Marin County Real Estate was provided by Sylvie Zolezzi.  I can be reached via email at Sylvie@YourPieceOfMarin.com or by phone/text at 415.505.4789.  I help people move in and out of Marin County, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I am here to help you make the smartest real estate move and build wealth, providing you with reliable real estate information and advice you can trust.

My knowledge and passion for Marin County are equaled by my commitment to helping you successfully navigate the process of buying and selling a home.  My business model enables me to provide superior service and a better client experience.  I know the neighborhoods, the schools, the amenities; I know where you want to live.  I know and love Marin County! 

I service the following towns in Marin County: Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere, Mill Valley, Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, Kentfield,  Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Fairfax, and Novato.